1, 2, 3, Lego!

thumbs upStudents and robots buzzed as teams awaited their turns at the Lego League to display everything they had been working towards in C3, a 5th grade gifted program that focuses on making connections, thinking critically and extending curriculum.

The Lego League was divided up into parts: project, Lego and teamwork. For student Alexander Pace, a member of Team 12, the Lego section stole the spotlight for him.

“My favorite part about the Lego league is the Legos because you can train the Legos on the computer and get them to go where you want them to go,” said Pace.

In the lego portion, students were required to show the skills they had programmed into their robot prior to the competition. The robot had to complete specific tasks to earn points, such as shooting a mini-soccer ball into a goal. The Lego portion was judged by three staff members; Assistant Superintendent Don Amonett, Chief of Administration Craig Harper and Tech Specialist Mike Leonard. In addition to completing the tasks, teams were interviewed by the judges.

“We wanted to find out why they built the robot the way they did and how they divided up their tasks between team members,” said Amonett.

According to Amonett, this year’s Lego League went smoother than year’s past, some thanks to new robots. However, smooth doesn’t correlate with simple.

“This table is the most difficult it’s ever been,” Amonett said.

Despite difficult obstacles, Team 12 acquired 125 points in Lego by completing door apprenticeship, changing conditions and goal.

To prepare for Lego League, students practiced during the day at C3 and occasionally after school. But it’s not all about the Legos. In the project section, teams work on their tri-boards, skits and presentations. Team 12’s focused on 4th grade social studies.

Pace’s team member Yasmeem Issa enjoyed the process of putting together the entire project.

“I liked working together as a team and getting to know everyone in C3,” Issa said.

Next year, another group of 5th graders will be put to the test and put through the challenges that this year’s group experienced. But Pace promised it’s all worth the hardship.

“The hardest part is getting past the mistakes,” he said. “But when you finally do it, you feel like a millionaire.”

From Turkey to Family, DPS Students Share What They Are Thankful for This Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving from Dalton Public Schools!

You Will Never Guess What DPS Students Love About Thanksgiving

Enjoy the holiday!

Dalton Middle School Teacher Recounts Year Teaching in China

Phillips with his homeroom students on the last day of class.

Phillips with his homeroom students on the last day of class.

Corey Phillips’s classroom is located down the 7th grade hall at Dalton Middle School. This is where the Ringgold native, who is in his first year at DMS, teaches his students social studies.

Last year, his classroom was quite a bit further away— it was in Dongguan, China. Continue reading

Morris Innovative High School Students Showcased Their Knowledge at the Presentation of Learning

From CPR to story telling, Morris Innovative High School students showcased their knowledge at the annual Presentation of Learning. Held throughout the entire high school, community members and students walked the halls and toured the many exhibits the event had to offer. The event gave the students an

ceviche fullopportunity to show what they are learning and doing for the community. Continue reading

Students Sound Off on Their Favorite Thanksgiving Foods

Can’t figure out your Thanksgiving menu? Take some tips from DPS students and hear about what they love to eat at Thanksgiving.

Superintendent, Kindergarten Students in Graduation Dress Rehearsal

Sarah Butler poses with Superintendent Dr. Jim Hawkins as a part of American Education Week. The photo is designed to reinforce the importance of setting the goal to graduate for both students and parents.

Sarah Butler poses with Superintendent Dr. Jim Hawkins as a part of American Education Week. The photo is designed to reinforce the importance of setting the goal to graduate for both students and parents.

 

Kindergarten students counted the children in front of them, anxiously waiting for their turn to put on a graduation gown and take a photo with Superintendent Dr. Jim Hawkins. As a part of American Education Week, Hawkins visited each Dalton elementary school to plant the goal of graduation into young, kindergarten minds. Continue reading